Introducing the BIEA

The British Institute in Eastern Africa has been active since 1960 and has its research centre  with accommodation, lecture facilities, work space and reference library in Nairobi, Kenya. The Institute is a registered charity which exists to promote research in all the disciplines in the humanities and social sciences within the wider region of eastern Africa. It offers financial support , affiliation services and logistical assistance to research projects, and runs a graduate attachment scheme. The Institute publishes a regular newsletter as well as the journal Azania: archaeological research in Africa and the Journal of Eastern African Studies.

Membership is open to all and we would be delighted if you would join us.

Announcements

Call for Papers

  1. ASAUK Conference 2020

We are currently calling for papers and panels as part of a thematic stream, ‘New moral economies of care and welfare in Africa: a return to the universal?’ which will be running from 8-10 September at the African Studies Association of the UK annual conference in Cardiff, UK. The stream is hosted by the ERC-Funded project, ‘Universal Health Coverage and the Public Good in Africa’.

The deadline for submissions is 22nd March, and the conference and panel stream website are here, showing individual panels and convenors: http://www.asauk.net/asauk-2020/thematic-streams-asauk2020/new-moral-economies-of-care-and-welfare-in-africa-a-return-to-the-universal/. Please you can submit your paper here:  HTTPS://WWW.CONFERENCE-SERVICE.COM/ASAUK2020/ACCESS.HTML  

Current sessions open for papers (from all relevant fields) include:

Thematic roundtable: ‘The universal and the public good – care and welfare in Africa’

Panel: ‘Generations of health and welfare in Africa: moral economy, history and the present’ (Convened by Holly Ashford and David Bannister)

Panel: ‘Beyond mobile money: Digital technologies, economic life and the public good in Africa’ (Convened by Tom Neumark)

Panel: ‘Healthcare, citizenship and the state: new figurations of obligation, solidarity and inequality in Africa’ (Convened by Jacinta Victoria Muinde, Ruth Prince and Jamie Wintrup)

Panel: ‘(Re)Distribution and Universalism: the moral economy of social protection and cash transfers’ (Convened by Liz Fouksman)

For more information, please contact the stream organisers Ruth Prince ([email protected]), Jacinta Victoria Muinde ([email protected]) and David Bannister ([email protected]).

Many thanks.

Universal Health Coverage and the Public Good in Africa: an anthropological and historical study: https://www.med.uio.no/helsam/english/research/projects/universal-health-coverage-africa/

  1. Royal Anthropological Institute Conference 2020

Ruth Prince (University of Oslo) and Jacinta Victoria Muinde (University of Oslo) wish to share the call for papers for the panel “Universal Health Coverage, health insurance and the market: universality, solidarity and care?” (Panel 14) for the RAI Conference- MED2020 :Mobilising Methods in Medical Anthropologyconference. The event will be held at The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, 3 to 4 September 2020.

The call for papers is now open and closes on 12 April 2020. Proposals should consist of a paper title, a short abstract of <300 characters and an abstract of 250 words. Please papers can be submitted can via the online form found on each panel page (https://nomadit.co.uk/conference/med2020#9286). Please see below details for our panel. 

Panel 14: Universal Health Coverage, health insurance and the market: universality, solidarity and care?

Convenors: Ruth Prince (University of Oslo) and Jacinta Victoria Muinde (University of Oslo)

Long Abstract

The Universal Health Coverage agenda is redefining global health, as it foregrounds a language of universality, the right to health care and demands for equity and social justice. Under the umbrella of financial protection and increasing access to quality health care, attempts to expand health insurance have become a cornerstone of UHC policies. In much of the Global South, insurance schemes have been limited to people in formal employment. Extending coverage means including people in the informal economy whose incomes are precarious. As digital and mobile technologies crowd into this field, insurance is emerging as field of experimentation, often combining a language of solidarity and a language of market innovation. This panel seeks to explore, ethnographically, these claims about solidarity and the market, and care, which surround the expansion of and experiments with health insurance worldwide.

Short Abstract

Under the umbrella of Universal Health Coverage, health insurance is emerging as field of experimentation, often combining a language of solidarity and a language of market innovation. This panel seeks to explore, ethnographically, claims about solidarity, the market, and care, which surround the expansion of and experiments with health insurance worldwide.

For further information or any questions please don’t hesitate to contact us: Ruth Prince ([email protected]) and Jacinta Victoria Muinde ([email protected] )

Call for Papers

August 31 – September 2, 2020.

JIAS (Johannesburg Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Tolip Street, Westdene, Johannesburg

The Impact and Legacy of British 1820 Settlers in South Africa: A bicentennial retrospective and prospective.

Johannesburg Institute for Advanced Study (JIAS), in association with Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Johannesburg; Centre for Leadership Ethics in Africa, at the University of Fort Hare; and The Market Theatre, Johannesburg.

The 1820 settlers constitute a socially diverse vanguard of British Imperialism in the Eastern Cape with long-term implications for the Xhosa, Zulu and Afrikaner nations, and the social, political and intellectual history of what was to become the Republic of South Africa. This conference marks the bi-centenary of this British colonial venture and seeks to explore its immediate and subsequent impact on the course of South African history from the perspectives not only of the colonialists, and their justifications of colonialism, but also from those peoples whose lives, livelihoods and cultures were threatened by the presence and expansion of British influence in the Eastern Cape and Natal (Zululand).

The conference will have a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary character. Abstracts may be submitted for consideration from a wide range of disciplinary fields; historical, sociological, anthropological, political and linguistic, to mention but a few.

Proximity between English and Xhosa speakers in the eastern Cape laid the basis for the dominance of the latter in indigenous southern African politics, education, literature, agriculture and Christianity, for the next 100 years. The liberal political tradition in South Africa owes its genesis to these circumstances. From a linguistics perspective, South African English and written Xhosa have their roots in the arrival of the 1820 British settlers. As a second language, English now predominates as the language of government, education, business, and media.

Papers to be presented at the Conference will be approximately 30 minutes in duration, followed by 30 minutes of questions.

Abstracts of proposed papers should be sent to Professor David Boucher, University of Johannesburg and Cardiff University. [email protected]

Deadline 30th April, 2020. Decisions will be communicated towards the end of May, 2020.

The JIAS conference will coincide with events/performances organised by Centre for Leadership Ethics in Africa, Fort Hare and the Market Theatre, Johannesburg.